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INTO THE ETHER, APR. 23 - JUN. 7
OPENING APR. 29, 2 - 5PM

Into the Ether is an upcoming group exhibition focusing on the nebulous and emphemeral--in hazy, high-key abstractions, airy pastels and immersive installation. Memory and myth are explored, even if in fleeting moments. Media includes painting, mixed media works, mylar drawings and sculptural installation.

 

The exhibition includes work by Sung Won Yun, Lydia Kinney, Samantha Eckert, and Kevin Xiques

Sung Won Yun, Invisible Traces

Kevin Xiques, based in Queens, NY, seeks clarity in his creations through self discovery by using painting as a vessel to find himself. Through unplanned intuitive mark making and gesture, his action or inaction informs his relationship with himself in the present moment; happiness, pain, love, and resentment all inhabit the world that he creates on the canvas. A piece himself is revealed, generated through an accumulation of intertwined gesture, shape, density, and color.

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Samantha Eckert

Sung Won Yun was born in Seoul, Korea and works in New York City. She is working on representing fundamental questions about homogenization of  cultural, ecological, or geological process in the congeries of time. The works exhibited, both drawings on mylar and large intricate paintings, are accumulations of countless layers of mark-making building into atmospheric and self-reflective spaces. 

 

Samantha Eckert is a Vermont-based multiple discipline, conceptual artist. Her practice is sourced through materiality; narratives emerge and expand in non-linear explorations. Materials are selected to articulate process and labor, form, and implication. Eckert is deeply influenced by her Italian heritage and handcrafted objects made by her mother and grandmother. Through their legacy, she explores memory myth, ancestry, loss, and longing, weaving between personal and political themes.

Lydia Kinney favors art that articulates a relationship to self, to body, space, and form. Abstraction gives her means to illustrate the often figurative sensations of loss (future tense), alienation (physical), and doubt. The work is environmental and ornamental, with adorned views into fields of color. Lydia’s work focuses on spatial abstractions, forming tensions of interior/exterior environments. Subjects include windows and pillars into other planes, disintegrating color fields, formally ambiguous confetti, and plays of texture.

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